Communicating with the Four DISC Styles

Behavior Assessments / Communication Articles / DISC Profile / DISC Training / Human Resource Management
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disc, four behavior styles

DISC Communication Styles

People have unique ways to communicate to each other. When you understand people are uniquely different based on their communication styles then you can better relate to your customers, peers and in your personal relationships. The key is to understand yourself first.  We measure communication styles with the DISC assessment.

  • How we express our internal emotions through our external behavior
  • How we prefer to interact (temperament) with the environment and the people around us

DISC represents four different communication stylesDISC Behaviors

D-Dominance

How we solve problems

I-Influence

How we relate to people

S-Steadiness

Our pace and energy level

C-Compliance

How we respond to rules and procedures

Communicating with the High D

  • Don’t ramble on or waste their time.
  • Stay on task.
  • Be clear, specific and to the point.
  • Don’t try to build personal relationships or chitchat.
  • Come prepared with all objectives and requirements in a well-organized manner.
  • Be prepared and organized.
  • Present the facts logically; plan your presentation efficiently.
  • Provide alternatives and choices so they can make their own decisions.
  • If you disagree, focus on the facts, not the High D’s personality.

Communicating with the High I

  • Talk and ask about their ideas and goals.
  • Plan interaction supporting their goals and ideas.
  • Allow time for relating and socializing.
  • Don’t drive to facts, figures and alternatives.
  • Help them get organized and put details in writing.
  • Don’t leave decisions in the air.
  • Provide ideas for implementing action.
  • Provide testimonials from people they see as important or prominent.
  • Offer incentives for their willingness to take risks.

Communicating with the High S

  • Don’t rush headlong into business or the agenda.
  • Show sincere interest in them as people.
  • Draw out their personal goals and objections.
  • Don’t force them to make a quick response.
  • Present your case logically, non-threateningly and in writing.
  • Break the ice with some personal comments.
  • Ask specific questions. (How?)
  • Don’t interrupt as they speak. Listen carefully.
  • Look for hurt feelings if the situation impacts them personally.

Communicating with the High C

  • Approach them in a straightforward, direct way.
  • Recognize they may be uncomfortable speaking too large groups.
  • Ask them if they see the issue the same way as you do.
  • Provide them with information and the time they need to make a decision.
  • Don’t be informal, casual, or personal.
  • Build credibility by looking at each side of the issue.
  • Don’t force a quick decision.
  • Be clear about expectations and deadlines.
  • If you disagree, prove it with data and facts or testimonials from reliable sources.

disc communication training and certification

 

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